Columbia Business School’s commitment to advance women in business gets a tremendous boost thanks to an additional $3 million in scholarships from the Laidlaw Foundation

2019-11-05T12:35:57+00:00Featured Post, Women in Business|

New Columbia Business School dean and David and Lyn Silfen Professor of Business, Costis Maglaras, has made diversity, equity, and inclusion a top priority. “My vision is an inclusive, supportive culture that lifts up voices that have historically been underrepresented in business—and to provide post-graduation support to help them reach the C-suite. Our first step is to ensure that the School is financially accessible for all who wish to study here.” Inaugural Vice Dean of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion and Meyer Feldberg Professor of Business, Gita Johar, concurs. “I will focus on enhancing and expanding our gender and diversity initiatives. We must take a cohesive, consistent approach to achieve the best outcomes.”

Research: When People See More Women at the Top, They’re Less Concerned About Gender Inequality Elsewhere

2019-11-05T12:46:03+00:00Women in Business|

Over the last two decades, organizations have seen substantial progress in increasing women’s representation in top leadership. While the numbers are still far from parity, the general view is that this progress for women in top leadership will naturally spread to improve women’s outcomes in other domains, such as pay equality. But is this true? Researchers conducted five studies measuring or experimentally manipulating people’s perceptions of gender diversity in top leadership, and found a strikingly consistent pattern: when people perceive greater levels of women’s representation in top leadership, they overgeneralize the extent to which women have access to equal opportunities, which then decreases their concern with gender inequality in pay and other domains. These findings are worrisome because people’s concern with inequality ultimately predicts their willingness to address it.

She or He

2019-11-05T12:45:12+00:00Article, Women in Business|

Over the last two decades, organizations have seen substantial progress in increasing women’s representation in top leadership. While the numbers are still far from parity, the general view is that this progress for women in top leadership will naturally spread to improve women’s outcomes in other domains, such as pay equality. But is this true? Researchers conducted five studies measuring or experimentally manipulating people’s perceptions of gender diversity in top leadership, and found a strikingly consistent pattern: when people perceive greater levels of women’s representation in top leadership, they overgeneralize the extent to which women have access to equal opportunities, which then decreases their concern with gender inequality in pay and other domains. These findings are worrisome because people’s concern with inequality ultimately predicts their willingness to address it.